Key Update, April 2019, Volume 15, Number 10

Key Update, April 2019

Volume 15, Number 10

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

TO CONTACT THE CLEARINGHOUSE: SELFHELPCLEARINGHOUSE@GMAIL.COM                                                TO CONTACT SUSAN ROGERS: SUSAN.ROGERS.ADVOCACY@GMAIL.COM                                  TO CONTACT JOSEPH ROGERS: JROGERS08034@GMAIL.COM

Honor Peer Leaders in Your Community at Alternatives 2019! (Early Bird Registration Deadline Extended to May 15!)

The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery (NCMHR), which will host Alternatives 2019—July 7-11 at The Catholic University in Washington, DC—has extended Early Bird Registration to May 15! The Early Bird rate is $295 for the full conference, $95 for one day.  And you have until May 3 to nominate a deserving peer leader for one of six different awards! Are you curious about the conference? The workshop titles have just been posted on the website! Alternatives 2019 will also feature a two-day pre-conference, including advocacy training and a “Hill Day,” when peer advocates will meet, by appointment, with the staff of their U.S. senators and congressional representatives. The theme is “Standing Together, Celebrating Our Gifts, Raising Our Voices.” For more information, including links to the award nomination form and the workshop titles, click here.

Five-Week “Treating Trauma Master Series” Features Expert Advice

In each one-hour session of the Treating Trauma Master Series—sponsored by the National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine—“the experts unpack the most important ideas, strategies, and applications for treating trauma. When you register for free, you can tune into the scheduled broadcasts every Wednesday and Thursday. (New modules are broadcast multiple times each Wednesday and Thursday, from April 17 through May 16.) You can join any time during the run of the series—each module is a stand-alone session.” (“Gold Subscribers” pay $197 for “downloads of each module to watch at any time…and more.”) For more information and to register for free, click here. For more about NICABM, click here.

Courtesy of Amy Smith

CDC EPIC Webinar on April 24 at 1 p.m. ET: “Cultural Competence in Preparedness Planning”

“When a disaster strikes a community, it affects people of various cultural backgrounds—sometimes disproportionately. Cultural competency can help public health communicators reduce this disparity,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) writes. The presenter “will discuss why cultural competency matters during emergencies, the potential consequences of being culturally incompetent, and resources to help build your understanding.” For more information and a link to join the webinar, click here. And for “Helping People with Mental Health Conditions Prepare for Disasters,” a publication of the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion and the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse, click here.

Courtesy of Lynn Keltz

Free Virtual Event: Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities

Join this free, interactive Recovery LIVE! virtual event on Thursday, April 25, from 2:00 p.m. to 3 p.m. ET. SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) invites you to be part of this conversation about how organizations and service providers can engage and support people with disabilities.  Specific focus will be devoted to individuals seeking treatment and recovery support services for serious mental health conditions or substance use disorders. Presenters include John de Miranda, National Association on Alcohol, Drugs and Disabilities; Anastasia Edmonston, Maryland Behavioral Health Administration’s Federal Traumatic Brain Injury State Partnership Grant; and Sterling Johnson, Legal Science. Bring your questions and, to register, click here!

Courtesy of Judene Shelley

Free Webinar: A Learning Session for Youth and Young Adult Leaders
On April 25 at 2 p.m. ET, the STAR Center will host a free online learning session for youth and young adult leaders with lived experience in the behavioral health system. “Are you an active youth leader in your organization or community? Are you looking for ways to step up your game? This session will focus on strategies to turn your leadership into action with the introduction of action and strategy tools.” The presenter is Johanna Bergan, executive director of Youth Move National. For more information and to register, click here.

Free Webinar: “Reconnecting with the Earth for Personal and Global Healing, Part II: The Calling”

On April 25, 2019, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ET, Oryx Cohen of the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery will moderate Part II of a webinar series that “explores ways of healing for our bodies, minds, and spirits and weaves connections for repair—not only on the personal, but also on a larger global and environmental scale. Through efforts showcased in the webinar series, a supportive infrastructure is emerging, and very much needed for resilience, empowerment, connection to the earth, and sustainable wellness in our communities.” For more information and to register, click here.

CSGJC Publishes Free Framework to Improve Police-Mental Health Collaborations

“Police-Mental Health Collaborations: A Framework for Implementing Effective Law Enforcement Responses for People Who Have Mental Health Needs,” published by the Council of State Governments Justice Center in April 2019, is “intended to help jurisdictions advance comprehensive, agency-wide responses to people who have mental illnesses…The framework is organized around six main questions that law enforcement executives should consider to be successful in implementing or improving police-mental health collaborations (PMHCs) in their jurisdiction.” For more information and to download the free 24-page publication, click here. (For more about the criminal justice system, in which many people with mental health conditions are incarcerated, see the criminal justice digest, below.)

Have You Been Harmed by Psychiatry? Share Your Story by April 30 as Part of the 2019 APA Protest.

“Share your story as part of the 2019 protest of the American Psychiatric Association on May 18, 2019. We’re collecting videos of people's experience with involuntary treatment, coercion, psychiatric abuse, courts, forced drugging, electroshock, insulin coma, outpatient committals, and more. Submit your three-minute video by April 30 to be included.” Sponsors include the Law Project for Psychiatric Rights, MindFreedom International, and the Network Against Psychiatric Assault. For more information and/or to submit your video, click here.

“Five Myths About Psychology: No, Talking About Difficult Things Isn’t Always Helpful.”

“Psychological discoveries continue to sharpen and refine our understanding of human suffering and of the human condition more broadly. Nonetheless, many myths about psychology persist,” according to a recent column in the Washington Post. For example, the author writes, “…About 10 percent of psychotherapy patients get worse during treatment, and only about half get better. One reason: Many therapists do not use evidence-based techniques and procedures shown to be effective in clinical trials.” Another myth challenged by the author involves the role of medication in treatment for mental health issues. For more about these two myths and the others that the author has identified, click here.   

Free Webinar on “Understanding Trauma and Post-Traumatic Growth” on April 30

On the last Tuesday of almost every month at 2 p.m. ET, Doors to Wellbeing hosts a free, one-hour webinar. On April 30, 2019, the topic will be “Understanding Trauma and Post-Traumatic Growth.” “Trauma can have a serious impact on our mental health and wellbeing, but many trauma survivors also report positive growth as a result of their experiences,” Doors to Wellbeing writes. “This webinar will explore the impact of trauma and post-traumatic growth (PTG) and how peer specialists can use the research on PTG in their own recovery and work with others.” To register, click here.

Mental Health America Offers Free “May Is Mental Health Month” Toolkit

“In 2019,” Mental Health America writes, “we are expanding upon last year’s theme of #4Mind4Body and taking it to the next level, as we explore the topics of animal companionships (including pets and support animals), spirituality, humor, work-life balance, and recreation and social connections as ways to boost mental health and general wellness.” For more information and to download the free toolkit (available after you provide your name, address, and email address), click here.

If You Have Experienced Psychosis, “Psychosis Beyond the Box” Wants to Hear From You.

“Psychosis Beyond the Box” seeks to gather anonymous descriptions of “aspects of psychosis that are often neglected, such as felt presences, visual or quasi-visual experiences, and alterations of space, time or distance,” as well as strategies to help with any distressing or challenging aspects of the experiences. The narratives will be compiled and shared in early psychosis programs and other service settings across the U.S. A major aim of the project—which is not a research project—is “to validate the diverse range of things people with psychosis experience, and help people, especially young adults experiencing psychosis for the first time, feel less alone and isolated (in these experiences).” For more information about the project, based at the University of South Florida, or to share your story, click here. Questions? Write to Nev Jones (genevra@usf.edu) or ShannonPagdon@gmail.com.

Nutritional Psychiatrists Counsel People Toward Achieving Better Mental Health

The field of nutritional psychiatry focuses on helping people eat better to help ease their depression and anxiety, The New York Times reports. According to a researcher at the Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, “‘Our imaging studies show that the brains of people who follow a Mediterranean-style diet typically look younger, have larger volumes and are more metabolically active than people who eat a more typical Western diet.’” People are advised to “cut out processed foods, minimize meat and dairy and eat more whole foods like fatty fish, vegetables and whole grains and legumes to cut the risk of developing degenerative brain diseases associated with aging.” At the same time, “a clinical instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School cautions that a plant-only diet may carry some risks…[and that] strict vegetarians and vegans may have somewhat higher rates of depression and eating disorders than those who eat a more varied diet. Those on a meat-free diet may also need to take supplements to provide missing nutrients.” For the article, click here.

Save the Date! NARMH Conference in Santa Fe, NM, August 26-29, 2019

The 2019 National Association for Rural Mental Health (NARMH) annual conference will be held in Santa Fe, N.M., August 26-29, 2019. The conference will focus on “Surviving to Thriving, Workforce Issues, Innovations in Service Delivery, Dilemmas in Addressing Trauma, Rural and Frontier Workforce Development Strategies, Embracing the Reality of Behavioral Health in Rural Communities—Struggles, Responses and Successes, Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders and Other Topics.” For more information and/or to register, click here.

A Growing Number of Video Games Tackle Mental Health Issues, The New York Times Reports

“[A]s a cultural conversation around mental health grows louder, makers of [video game] content are responding,” according to a recent article in The New York Times. “Some makers are now developing games to explicitly promote better mental health.” A game called Celeste “explored depression and anxiety through a protagonist who had to avoid physical and emotional obstacles. In 2017’s fantasy action-adventure video game Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice, a young Celtic warrior deals with psychosis. Other games in recent years, including Night in the Woods and Pry, have delved into self-identity, anger issues and post-traumatic stress disorder. All followed the 2013 interactive fiction game Depression Quest, which asked players to step into the shoes of a character living with depression.” To read the article, click here.

Prejudice Against Voice Hearers Varies, Depending on an Array of Factors, Researchers Find

According to a new study, the prejudice associated with the experience of hearing voices “depends upon what the voice is saying and perceptions about the cause of the voice.” “One hundred forty-three nonclinical participants were presented with vignettes describing people who heard voices that were attributed to either ‘God’ or ‘Abraham Lincoln’ and were described as either complimentary/encouraging or insulting/ threatening. For each vignette, participants were asked about the likelihood that the voice-hearer had schizophrenia or mental illness…Stigma was measured by perceived dangerousness and desire for social distance.” The researchers—including individuals with lived experience—write, “This research suggests that public causal models of voice-hearing experiences vary substantially depending upon the specific contents of the voice (positive, negative, religious, nonreligious) and characteristics of the perceiver (religious vs. nonreligious) and that these variations affect stigma reactions.” For the study, published in Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal in April 2019, click here.

Research Debunks the Existence of “Depression Genes”

A “new University of Colorado Boulder study assessing genetic and survey data from 620,000 individuals found that the 18 most highly studied candidate genes for depression are actually no more associated with it than randomly chosen genes,” according to an article in MDLinx Internal Medicine. “‘This study confirms that efforts to find a single gene or handful of genes which determine depression are doomed to fail,’” said the lead author. “‘We are not saying that depression is not heritable at all. It is,’” said a second researcher. “‘What we are saying is that depression is influenced by many, many variants, and individually each of those has a minuscule effect.’” The researchers “set out to see if any of the genes, or gene variants, were associated with depression either alone or when combined with an environmental factor like childhood trauma or socioeconomic diversity.” “‘It's like in “The Emperor Wears No Clothes.” There’s just nothing there,’” said the second researcher. For the article about the study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, click here.

Courtesy of Fran Hazam

“Psychosis: What Is It?” A Free Course and a Free Book Try to Answer This Question

A brief course sponsored by Integrative Mental Health for You (IMHU)—“a not-for-profit online resource for exploring effective options to optimize wellness”—is aimed at “anyone with lived experience and their loved ones, and trained therapists who want to explore new viewpoints.” IMHU writes: “Watch a variety of compelling videos, read select articles, and rethink extreme states, how to label and navigate them. Listen to reflections of those with lived experience as well as qualified support people who evaluate the risks of anti-psychotics and conventional care.” For more information, click here.

Courtesy of Lauren Spiro

“Can We Get Better at Forgetting?” The Answer Is Yes.

“Some things aren’t worth remembering,” The New York Times writes. “Science is slowly working out how we might let that stuff go…A new study, published this month in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that some things can be intentionally relegated to oblivion…To intentionally forget is to remember differently, on purpose…[I]ntentional forgetting also may be an ability that can be practiced and deliberately strengthened.” This is because “activating a memory also makes it temporarily fragile and vulnerable to change. This is where intentional forgetting comes in. It’s less about erasing than editing: incrementally revising, refocusing and potentially dimming the central incident of the memory.” For the New York Times article, click here.

The April 2019 Digest of Articles about the Criminal Justice System, in Which Many Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Are Incarcerated (and the Key Update continues after this Digest)

Here is the April wrap-up of stories about the criminal justice system. (Note: Some of the titles and other language are not politically correct but are reproduced as written.) For “He’s Living With Severe Mental Illness. Should He Face the Death Penalty? A South Dakota case reflects the national debate on whether execution should be banned for the mentally ill,” click here. For “National Inventory of Collateral Consequences of Conviction,” click here. For “The National Registry of Exonerations: Exonerations in 2018,” click here. For “Introducing News Inside: The Marshall Project launches a print publication that will be distributed in prisons and jails,” click here. For “The Everyday Brutality of America’s Prisons,” click here. For “[Canadian] government ordered to pay $20M for placing mentally ill inmates in solitary confinement,” click here. For “New Orleans Wants to Make Its Notorious Jail Bigger: Activists Say the Sheriff Is Trying to Add Jail Beds Under the Guise of Mental Health Treatment,” click here. For “Prison Arts Programs Produce Change That No Audit Can Measure,” click here. For “Who Belongs in Prison? A truly just system must do more than protect the rights of the innocent; it must also respect the humanity of the guilty,” click here. For “John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute Maps [New York] State Prison Education Programs,” click here. For “21 more studies showing racial disparities in the criminal justice system,” click here. For “Massachusetts Mental Health Court Serves As Alternative To Jail time,” click here. For “SC inmate’s baby died in toilet: Lawsuits allege rampant medical neglect in prisons,” click here. For “Meet the Grown-Ups Keeping Kids Out of Prison: The Youth Correctional Leaders for Justice will help guide towns, cities, and states on how to close youth prisons for good,” click here. For “Five years on, Carnegie Hall’s Lullaby Project is going strong,” click here. For “Making musical connections at Sing-Sing Prison,” click here. For “If Prisons Don’t Work, What Will? The Democratic presidential candidates should look at what a growing number of prosecutors are doing to end mass incarceration,” click here. For “A Unique Approach to Career-Focused Prison Reentry Programming,” click here. For “My jail stopped using solitary confinement. Here’s why,” click here. For “A Father’s Story: How Shoplifting Led to My Son Spending 7 Months in Solitary,” click here. For “Addressing mental health in criminal justice system requires training, systemic changes, visiting professor says,” click here. For “These Men Are Fighting to Abolish the Death Penalty—From Death Row,” click here. For “When ‘Violent Offenders’ Commit Non-Violent Crimes,” click here. For “Inside America’s Block Box: A Rare Look at the Violence of Incarceration: Would we fix our prisons if we could see what happens inside them?,” click here. For “Designing in Prison: Part Three,” click here. For “German-Style Program at a Connecticut Maximum Security Prison Emphasizes Rehab for Inmates,” click here. For “Six Necessary Principles for Successful Decarceration,” click here. For “Promoting a New Direction for Youth Justice: Strategies to Fund a Community-Based Continuum of Care and Opportunity,” click here. For “Criminal Justice Legislation Means Nothing Without Follow-Through: Sentencing disparities and felon disenfranchisement can end on paper, but the stigmatization that comes with incarceration remains,” click here. For “Psychological Restorative Solutions, P.C., Presents T.A.S.T.E.,” click here. For “Even Very Short Jail Sentences Drive People Away from Voting,” click here.

FROM PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE KEY UPDATE BUT STILL FRESH!

“Experiences with Hospitalization” Survey Wants to Hear from You

“The purpose of this survey is to help us understand people's lived experience with voluntary and involuntary treatment because of suicidal thoughts. It was created by people with lived experience…We are planning to use this information to facilitate discussions with suicidologists and the suicide prevention community about the impact of the use of these interventions, particularly within marginalized populations. We feel the voice of people with lived experience with these interventions has not had adequate opportunity to be heard, and hope that by completing this survey anonymously, people who have been most impacted can find a safe way to share their experiences. Please note that this is not a research project.” For more information and/or to participate, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin Seek Participants for Depression Study

Trinity College Dublin researchers write: “We are a team of psychologists at Trinity College Dublin who are trying to better understand depression. We are interested in using language to predict the occurrence of depression early. Our hope is that in doing so we can one day be able to help doctors provide treatments earlier and maybe even prevent depression altogether. In order to participate, you must be at least 18 years old, have had a Twitter account for at least one year, [and] have at least 500 Tweets. Interested in participating? Learn more by clicking. If not, thanks for taking the time to read about our research.” For the “continue” link to more information, click here.

Mental Health First Aid Australia Seeks Research Participants to Update MHFA Guidelines

Mental Health First Aid Australia is inviting people from Australia, UK, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA who have expertise in the field of psychosis to participate in research whose goal is to update the Mental Health First Aid guidelines for psychosis, which were last updated in 2008. Invited participants include people with lived experience of psychosis, people who have cared for or provided significant support to someone with psychosis, and professionals with research, education, or clinical experience related to psychosis. For more information, click here.

International Survey on Antipsychotic Medication Withdrawal Seeks Respondents

“Have you taken antipsychotic medication (such as Zyprexa, Seroquel, Abilify, Risperdal, Haldol, Geodon, Stelazine, and others), for any condition or diagnosis, with or without other medications? And did you ever stop taking antipsychotics, or try to stop taking them? Are you 18 years or older? If yes, you can take this survey about antipsychotic withdrawal and attempts to withdraw, including if you stopped taking them completely or if you tried to come off and still take them. The survey aims to improve mental health services by better understanding medication withdrawal. Lead researcher is Will Hall, a therapist and Ph.D. student who has himself taken antipsychotics. Service users/survivors/consumers from around the world also gave input. The study is sponsored by Maastricht University in the Netherlands; co-sponsors include the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. Questions? Please contact will.hall@maastrichtuniversity.nl.”  For more information or to take the survey, click on www.antipsychoticwithdrawalsurvey.com

What Is a Peer Support Specialist? Your Opinion Is Wanted

“On behalf of iNAPS, a national workgroup has developed a proposed definition for peer support specialist to submit for federal standard occupational classification through the U.S. Department of Labor,” iNAPS writes. “We are asking you to complete this short survey regarding the proposed definition...The proposed title, Peer Support Specialist, does not prevent the use of other job titles, such as Recovery Coach, Peer Bridger, Peer Navigator, etc.” To complete the survey, click here.

New Virtual Group Is Launched to Advance Peer Research Capacity, Leadership, and Involvement

Nev Jones, Ph.D., and Emily Cutler, a doctoral candidate, have launched a new listserv dedicated to building research capacity, leadership, and involvement among peers, survivors, and service users.  Dr. Jones, assistant professor, Department of Mental Health Law & Policy, University of South Florida, was part of the team that developed “User/Survivor Leadership & Capacity Building in Research: White Paper on Promoting Engagement Practices in Peer Evaluation/Research (PEPPER),” published by the Lived Experience Research Network. For the white paper, click here. Anyone interested in joining the virtual group can email Nev at nev.inbox@gmail.com.

Save the Date! NARPA Annual Rights Conference September 18-21 in Hartford, Connecticut

“For more than 30 years, NARPA [National Association for Rights Protection & Advocacy] has provided an educational conference with inspiring keynoters and outstanding workshops. We learn from each other and come together as a community committed to social justice for people with psychiatric labels & developmental disabilities.” For more information, click here.

Disclaimer: The Clearinghouse does not necessarily endorse the opinions and opportunities included in the Key Update.

About The Key Update

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 15, No. 10, April 2019. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at selfhelpclearinghouse@gmail.com (and please note that this is a new email address). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

Key Update, March 2019, Volume 15, Number 9

Key Update, March 2019

Volume 15, Number 9

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

TO CONTACT THE CLEARINGHOUSE: SELFHELPCLEARINGHOUSE@GMAIL.COM                                                 

TO CONTACT SUSAN ROGERS: SUSAN.ROGERS.ADVOCACY@GMAIL.COM                                                     

TO CONTACT JOSEPH ROGERS: JROGERS08034@GMAIL.COM

Free Manual on “Tackling Mental Health Prejudice and Discrimination” Is Hot Off the Virtual Press

The Temple University (TU) Collaborative on Community Inclusion and the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse have written and published “Tackling Mental Health Prejudice and Discrimination.” The free manual offers information on anti-prejudice and anti-discrimination initiatives that people with lived experience, particularly those involved in peer-run programs, have successfully implemented in the past. “The goal is to provide useful guidance for new peer-based efforts to tackle prejudice and discrimination.” For the manual, and links to other information from the TU Collaborative, click here.

Early Bird Registration Deadline Extended for Alternatives 2019 (Deadline: April 26)! And You Can Still Nominate a Keynote Speaker (Deadline: March 28)!

The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery (NCMHR), which will host Alternatives 2019—July 7-11 at The Catholic University in Washington, DC—is extending the deadline for Early Bird Registration to April 26! The Early Bird rate is $295 for the full conference, $95 for one day.  And the deadline for nominating a keynote speaker has been extended to March 28! The NCMHR writes that the Alternatives Conference, now in its fourth decade, “is renowned for offering the latest and best information in the peer recovery movement, and a chance for peers to network with and learn from one another. Now the People's Alternatives once again, this conference is funded entirely through registration fees and donations.” Alternatives 2019 will feature a two-day pre-conference, including advocacy training and a “Hill Day,” when peer advocates will meet, by appointment, with the staff of their U.S. senators and congressional representatives. The theme is “Standing Together, Celebrating Our Gifts, Raising Our Voices.” For more information, click here.

Free Webinar on “Benefits of Recovery Environments” on March 26

On the last Tuesday of almost every month at 2 p.m. ET, Doors to Wellbeing hosts a free, one-hour webinar. On March 26, 2019, Doors to Wellbeing will present “Benefits of Recovery Environments. “As mental health peer specialists, how do we create an environment that fosters recovery and growth? Ahmad Abojaradeh will discuss best practices for creating an environment for enhancing mental health and personal empowerment to make changes in one’s life.” The learning objectives are: “Recognize the foundations of recovery environments, list at least three steps to create an inclusive recovery environment, and identify at least three ways in which creating a recovery environment enhances workplace wellness.” To register, click here.

Free Interactive BRSS TACS Event on Engaging People from Latinx Communities in Treatment and Recovery Support Services

“Join this free, interactive Recovery LIVE! virtual event on Thursday, March 28 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ET. SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) invites you to be part of this conversation about providing culturally responsive services to individuals and families from Hispanic and Latino communities to improve engagement and retention. Presenters include Diliana DeJesús, Casa Esperanza, Inc.; Jamie Bailey, Project Vida/Recovery Alliance of El Paso; and Luis Rosales, Trilogy Recovery Community. Bring your questions and register today!”

Thanks, Judene Shelley.

Webinar on “How to Launch a Podcast That Makes a Difference” on March 28 at 3 p.m. ET

On March 28, p.m. at 3 p.m. ET, for the ticket price of just under $7, “Bo Hammond, CEO and founder of Tours for Humanity, a DC-based walking tour company, will teach the basics of launching a powerful podcast that can spread your message…Podcasts have quickly become one of the newest tools for delivering your message and expanding your support, but where does a company or an individual even begin to create one? How do you post it? Edit it? Market it? Get funding? This webinar seeks to answer all these questions and more.” For information and to register, click here.

Thanks, Fran Hazam.

“Experiences with Hospitalization” Survey Wants to Hear from You

“The purpose of this survey is to help us understand people's lived experience with voluntary and involuntary treatment because of suicidal thoughts. It was created by people with lived experience…We are planning to use this information to facilitate discussions with suicidologists and the suicide prevention community about the impact of the use of these interventions, particularly within marginalized populations. We feel the voice of people with lived experience with these interventions has not had adequate opportunity to be heard, and hope that by completing this survey anonymously, people who have been most impacted can find a safe way to share their experiences. Please note that this is not a research project.” For more information and/or to participate, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris.

“28 Ways to Make the World Less Hostile to Mad, Neurodivergent, and Psychiatrically Disabled People”

In a recent piece in Radical Abolitionist, five authors who identify as “Mad, neurodivergent, and psychiatrically disabled people” (MNPD) suggest 28 ways to make the world less hostile to them and others like them. Among the suggestions: “Research the impact that coercive treatments and practices have had on MNPD individuals.” “Radically reconsider what constitutes expertise. If you believe that mental health professionals know more about a person’s experiences, wants, desires, and needs than that person themselves, examine some of the prejudices and biases that may be underlying this belief.” “Advocate for policies that increase the resources and social safety nets for MNPD people.” And 25 more! For the article, click here.

Thanks, Stephanie Jamison.

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin Seek Participants for Depression Study

Trinity College Dublin researchers write: “We are a team of psychologists at Trinity College Dublin who are trying to better understand depression. We are interested in using language to predict the occurrence of depression early. Our hope is that in doing so we can one day be able to help doctors provide treatments earlier and maybe even prevent depression altogether. In order to participate, you must be at least 18 years old, have had a Twitter account for at least one year, [and] have at least 500 Tweets. Interested in participating? Learn more by clicking. If not, thanks for taking the time to read about our research.” For the “continue” link to more information, click here.

“FDA Approves First Drug for Postpartum Depression,” NY Times Reports; But Some Experts Question Its Use

The first drug to treat postpartum depression was recently approved by the FDA, The New York Times reports. The reportedly fast-acting drug, called brexanolone—a 60-hour infusion which requires a stay in a certified medical center—will be expensive; “insurers said this week that they are evaluating the drug,” according to the story in the Times. A more-accessible pill “is showing promise in its clinical trials.” For the article, click here. However, in “PostPartum Depression: Is Brexanalone the Answer,” in Mad In America, the author, a holistic women’s health psychiatrist, paints a less optimistic picture: “In September of 2017, brexanolone failed its clinical trial as a treatment for super-refractory status epilepticus, but just two months later, the drug was being touted as a cure for postpartum depression, gaining fast-track status from the FDA. That’s despite the fact that the more trials were conducted, and the larger the sample of women they tested became, the less statistical significance the drug’s effect showed… compared to an ordinary placebo.” For the Mad In America article, click here. And, in an opinion piece in the Times, the authors write: “It’s worth pointing out that the Zulresso study was small, involving 247 women, and that the drug maker was involved in its design and interpretation…we fear that Zulresso [the brand name for brexanalone] is just a stopgap, and yet another instance of pathologizing a very sane reaction to our very insane culture….More research is needed before we can be sure that this is not just the latest in a long line of drugs offered to women as a quick fix of middling efficacy, with the potential for unexpected side effects.” For the op ed, click here.

Raise the Minimum Wage and Decrease Suicide, a New Study Reports

A “new study shows that increases in state minimum wages have been associated with decreases in suicide rates in recent years,” according to the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. The authors of the study, in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, “studied retrospective data for all 50 states to determine the relationship between changes in state minimum wages and suicide rates between 2006 and 2016...With 432,000 reported deaths by suicide in the time period, the team found that a one-dollar increase in the real minimum wage was associated on average with a 1.9 percent decrease in the annual state suicide rate, or nearly 8,000 fewer deaths by suicide…[T]his recent study shows how reversing increases in suicide deaths requires more than improved access to health care. Policy makers must consider poor social, economic, housing and labor conditions and their impacts on suicide rates.” For the article, click here.

Thanks, Bethany Lilly.

“Mental Health Apps Lean on Bots and Unlicensed Therapists.” Are They Effective?

“Mental health care services are going through a quiet revolution, fueled in part by the widely acknowledged problem of access to therapists and other licensed professionals,” according to a recent article in Nature. This revolution includes mental health “apps” that offer help that may be provided by people who are not licensed. For example, Sibly, based in San Francisco, uses smartphone instant messaging provided by four to six unlicensed “coaches.” But some experts question whether such new online services “will actually have a positive impact, or whether offering mental health care without involving licensed therapists has the potential to cause real harm. ‘Is the technology being used to just reduce the quality of mental healthcare? I think that’s a concern,’ says John Torous, director of the digital psychiatry division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.” At the same time, there is a growing body of evidence for the effectiveness of peer support, i.e., support by people who have lived experience of the mental health system but may not have any formal training (click here). For the Nature article, click here.

More Evidence Confirms That Gun Access Is the Major Cause of Gun Violence

“Despite the public, political, and media narrative that mental health is at the root of gun violence, evidence is lacking to infer a causal link,” according to a recently published article. The data were from a longitudinal study in Texas; the 663 participants had an average age of 22 and were 61.7 percent female. “…individuals who had gun access were 18.15 times and individuals with high hostility were 3.51 times more likely to have threatened someone with a gun, after controlling for demographic factors and prior mental health treatment…Counter to public beliefs, the majority of mental health symptoms examined were not related to gun violence. Instead, access to firearms was the primary culprit. The findings have important implications for gun control policy efforts.” For the abstract, click here.

A Peer Specialist Training Manual in Spanish Can Expand Such Training to the Latinx Community

A training manual entitled “Peer2peer: Curso de formación professional” is available to help train peer support specialists whose preferred language is Spanish. For the free 180-page manual, click here.

Thanks, Maria Ostheimer.

The Atlantic Calls BS on Psychiatry in “Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris”

“The biology of mental illness is still a mystery, but practitioners don’t want to admit it.” This is the teaser on an article in the April 2019 edition of The Atlantic, which calls into question the science behind psychiatry. Reviewing a new book—Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness—the article’s author notes: “…it’s a tale of promising roads that turned out to be dead ends, of treatments that seemed miraculous in their day but barbaric in retrospect, of public-health policies that were born in hope but destined for disaster.” For the article, click here.

You Have a Right to See Your Medical Records but Not Your Psychotherapist’s Notes

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “The Privacy Rule gives you, with few exceptions, the right to inspect, review, and receive a copy of your medical records and billing records that are held by health plans and health care providers covered by the Privacy Rule.” However, “[y]ou do not have the right to access a provider’s psychotherapy notes. Psychotherapy notes are notes that a mental health professional takes during a conversation with a patient. They are kept separate from the patient’s medical and billing records. HIPAA also does not allow the provider to make most disclosures about psychotherapy notes about you without your authorization.” For more, click here.

“6 Reasons Why Comics Can Improve Mental Health”

“Comics have the power to improve mental health and here are six reasons why: 1. They have relatable characters. 2. Comics are inspirational. 3. Comics help to build relationships. 4. Cosplaying is awesome. 5. Graphic novels will encourage you to read. 6. You’ll be exposed to a different way of thinking.” For more, click here.

The March 2019 Digest of Articles about the Criminal Justice System, in Which Many Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Are Incarcerated (and the Key Update continues after this Digest)

Here is the March wrap-up of stories about the criminal justice system. (Note: Some of the titles and other language are not politically correct but are reproduced as written.) For “The Jail Health-Care Crisis,” click here. For “Critical Voices on Criminal Justice: Essays from Directly Affected Authors,” click here. For “It’s Official: First Jail Accredited As A Mental Health Facility. Need Help? Get Arrested! Outrageous!” click here. For “The insanity defense isn’t available in every state. It should be,” click here. For “‘Medicare for All’ Is Missing a Vital Group: The Incarcerated,” click here. For “Two recent opinions by Justice Clarence Thomas should alarm us all,” click here. For “NYPD’s Mental-Illness Response Breakdown,” click here. For “Reimagining Prison with Frank Gehry: Prison as college campus. Prison as wellness center. Prison as monastery,” click here. For “It’s reasonable to want to rid the world of evil. But the death penalty can’t do that,” click here. For “Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2019,” click here. For “Seriously Ill Federal Prisoners Freed As Compassionate Release Law Takes Effect,” click here. For “Companies pledge to hire more applicants with criminal backgrounds,” click here. For “Philly probation violators are finally getting real hearings. Many are being released,” click here. For “RESCALED aims to thoroughly reform detention as a form of punishment in Europe. All prisons should be replaced by detention houses…embedded in their immediate environment and community,” click here. For “Why Reimagining Prison for Young Adults Matters,” click here. For “ACLU disputes Corrections’ solitary confinement numbers,” click here. For “Without access to credit, ex-cons may return to lives of crime,” click here. For “After 40 years in solitary, activist Albert Woodfox tells his story of survival,” click here. For “Building Justice/Impact Justice,” click here. For “The Case for Expunging Criminal Records,” click here. For “After 21 years in prison, an ex-offender has a job—and a better future,” click here.

FROM PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE KEY UPDATE BUT STILL FRESH!

Mental Health First Aid Australia Seeks Research Participants to Update MHFA Guidelines

Mental Health First Aid Australia is inviting people from Australia, UK, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA who have expertise in the field of psychosis to participate in research whose goal is to update the Mental Health First Aid guidelines for psychosis, which were last updated in 2008. Invited participants include people with lived experience of psychosis, people who have cared for or provided significant support to someone with psychosis, and professionals with research, education, or clinical experience related to psychosis. For more information, click here.

International Survey on Antipsychotic Medication Withdrawal Seeks Respondents

“Have you taken antipsychotic medication (such as Zyprexa, Seroquel, Abilify, Risperdal, Haldol, Geodon, Stelazine, and others), for any condition or diagnosis, with or without other medications? And did you ever stop taking antipsychotics, or try to stop taking them? Are you 18 years or older? If yes, you can take this survey about antipsychotic withdrawal and attempts to withdraw, including if you stopped taking them completely or if you tried to come off and still take them. The survey aims to improve mental health services by better understanding medication withdrawal. Lead researcher is Will Hall, a therapist and Ph.D. student who has himself taken antipsychotics. Service users/survivors/consumers from around the world also gave input. The study is sponsored by Maastricht University in the Netherlands; co-sponsors include the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. Questions? Please contact will.hall@maastrichtuniversity.nl.”  For more information or to take the survey, click on www.antipsychoticwithdrawalsurvey.com

What Is a Peer Support Specialist? Your Opinion Is Wanted

“On behalf of iNAPS, a national workgroup has developed a proposed definition for peer support specialist to submit for federal standard occupational classification through the U.S. Department of Labor,” iNAPS writes. “We are asking you to complete this short survey regarding the proposed definition...The proposed title, Peer Support Specialist, does not prevent the use of other job titles, such as Recovery Coach, Peer Bridger, Peer Navigator, etc.” To complete the survey, click here.

New Virtual Group Is Launched to Advance Peer Research Capacity, Leadership, and Involvement

Nev Jones, Ph.D., and Emily Cutler, a doctoral candidate, have launched a new listserv dedicated to building research capacity, leadership, and involvement among peers, survivors, and service users.  Dr. Jones, assistant professor, Department of Mental Health Law & Policy, University of South Florida, was part of the team that developed “User/Survivor Leadership & Capacity Building in Research: White Paper on Promoting Engagement Practices in Peer Evaluation/Research (PEPPER),” published by the Lived Experience Research Network. For the white paper, click here. Anyone interested in joining the virtual group can email Nev at nev.inbox@gmail.com.

Save the Date! NARPA Annual Rights Conference September 18-21 in Hartford, Connecticut

“For more than 30 years, NARPA [National Association for Rights Protection & Advocacy] has provided an educational conference with inspiring keynoters and outstanding workshops. We learn from each other and come together as a community committed to social justice for people with psychiatric labels & developmental disabilities.” For more information, click here.

Disclaimer: The Clearinghouse does not necessarily endorse the opinions and opportunities included in the Key Update.

About The Key Update

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 15, No. 9, March 2019. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at selfhelpclearinghouse@gmail.com (and please note that this is a new email address). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

 

Key Update, February 2019, Volume 15, Number 8

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

 

TO CONTACT THE CLEARINGHOUSE: SELFHELPCLEARINGHOUSE@GMAIL.COM                                                 

TO CONTACT SUSAN ROGERS: SUSAN.ROGERS.ADVOCACY@GMAIL.COM                                                     

TO CONTACT JOSEPH ROGERS: JROGERS08034@GMAIL.COM

Registration Is Open for Alternatives 2019! Submit a Workshop Proposal! And Learn How You Can Get Involved!

The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery (NCMHR) will host Alternatives 2019—“Standing Together, Celebrating Our Gifts, Raising Our Voices”—at The Catholic University in Washington, DC, July 7-11! The Early Bird rate—$295 for the full conference, $95 for one day—will be available through March 30. The deadline for submitting a workshop proposal is March 20. And there are opportunities to participate in the planning! The NCMHR writes that the Alternatives Conference, now in its fourth decade, “is renowned for offering the latest and best information in the peer recovery movement, and a chance for peers to network with and learn from one another. Now the People's Alternatives once again, this conference is funded entirely through registration fees and donations.” Alternatives 2019 will include a two-day pre-conference, including advocacy training and a “Hill Day,” when peer advocates will meet, by appointment, with the staff of their U.S. senators and congressional representatives. For more information, click here.

FDA Panel Recommends Controversial Treatment for Depression; Prominent Psychiatrist Urges Caution

“In a move that may clear the way for the first new treatment in years for depression, an expert panel [recently] recommended that federal regulators approve a nasal spray that delivers the active ingredients of ketamine, a popular club drug in the 1980s and 1990s,” according to The New York Times. “The new drug…is aimed at people with severe depression, particularly those with suicidal thinking. The panel…was nearly unanimous in deciding that the drug’s benefits outweighed its risks…The federal agency has until March 4 to decide whether to approve the drug.” However, in 2016, Dr. Allen Frances, chair of the DSM-IV Task Force, critic of the DSM-V, and author of Saving Normal, wrote: “Ketamine is a classic case of commercial hype and exploitation racing far ahead of scientific proof.” On February 17, 2019, he tweeted: “#FDA is making tragic mistake prematurely approving #ketamine for #depression. Reminds me of its rush 20 yrs ago to OK #Oxycontin…FDA buys hype/misses risks/serves #pharma.” For the New York Times article, click here. For the article by Dr. Frances, click here. For a related article, “Prominent Psychiatrist Tells CNN Why Antidepressants Are So Dangerous,” click here.

What Is a Peer Support Specialist? Your Opinion Is Wanted

“On behalf of iNAPS [International Association of Peer Supporters], a national workgroup has developed a proposed definition for peer support specialist to submit for federal standard occupational classification through the U.S. Department of Labor,” iNAPS writes. “We are asking you to complete this short survey regarding the proposed definition...The proposed title, Peer Support Specialist, does not prevent the use of other job titles, such as Recovery Coach, Peer Bridger, Peer Navigator, etc.” To complete the survey, click here.

A New Approach to Supporting Social Workers Who Have a Mental Health Condition, by the TU Collaborative

Social workers with mental [health conditions] offer unique contributions to service delivery, but also face unique challenges,” according to a new article published in Social Work in Mental Health. “They must weigh the risks and benefits of disclosing their condition in the workplace and are more susceptible to burnout. Past efforts made by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) to support social workers with personal concerns have had limited success. This article sets forth a new approach to supporting these social workers which involves one-on-one peer support, peer education, advocacy opportunities, assistance with requests for job accommodations, a speaker’s bureau, and organizational consultation on peer issues within agencies.” For the article, click here.

“Peer Support Tied to Fewer Repeat Mental Health Hospitalizations,” Study Finds

“Adults who have been hospitalized for psychiatric problems may be less likely to be readmitted when they get support from other patients who went through similar experiences, a UK study suggests.” Reuters, reporting on a study published in The Lancet in August 2018, continued: “Researchers followed 441 patients for one year after they were discharged from the hospital. All of them received personal recovery workbooks to help them manage their own care. Half of them also received 10 sessions with a peer support worker with a history of mental illness. One year after they left the hospital, patients who received peer counseling were 34 percent less likely to have a repeat admission than people who didn’t get this type of support, the study found.” For the Reuters article, which includes a link to the Lancet study, click here.

“A Quick Guide to Research and Evidence on Peer Support” Is Available

“Peer Support: Evidence and Experience,” a free two-page brochure including definitions, history, and select references, is available for free download. The brochure, subtitled “A Quick Guide to Research and Evidence on Peer Support,” is authored by Rebecca Miller, Ph.D., a licensed clinical psychologist and assistant professor at the Yale School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry; and Laura Van Tosh, a longtime activist in the movement for social justice of individuals with lived experience, and a consultant with Companis Seattle, which matches volunteer professionals with nonprofit agencies in need of staffing assistance. For the free brochure, click here.

Save the Date! NARPA Annual Rights Conference September 18-21 in Hartford, Connecticut

“For more than 30 years, NARPA [National Association for Rights Protection & Advocacy] has provided an educational conference with inspiring keynoters and outstanding workshops. We learn from each other and come together as a community committed to social justice for people with psychiatric labels & developmental disabilities.” For more information, click here.

“Listening to the Music You Love Will Make Your Brain Release More Dopamine, Study Finds”

“A new study has found that dopamine—a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in our cognitive, emotional, and behavioral functioning—plays a direct role in the reward experience induced by music. The new findings have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.” For the article, click here.

“Teenagers Say Depression and Anxiety are Major Issues Among Their Peers,” New York Times Reports

A Pew Research Center survey of 920 teenagers aged 13 to 17 “found that 70 percent of teenagers saw mental health as a big issue. Fewer teenagers cited bullying, drug addiction or gangs as major problems; those from low-income households were more likely to do so,” according to a recent story in The New York Times. For the story, click here. A related Times story—“As Students Struggle with Stress and Depression, Colleges Act as Counselors”—notes that “[m]ore than 60 percent of college students said they had experienced ‘overwhelming anxiety’ in the past year, according to a 2018 report from the American College Health Association. Over 40 percent said they felt so depressed they had difficulty functioning.” For that story, click here.

“Exploring Alternate Pathways to Voice-Hearing”

In a new study published in Schizophrenia Bulletin the authors “suggest that trauma can play a major role in some hallucinations, a minor role in many, or no role in other hallucinations. They write that ‘there is enough evidence to conclude that trauma is a significant risk factor for psychosis and for voice-hearing in particular. Yet the finding that trauma increases the risk for hallucinations and for psychosis is quite different from the claim that trauma is necessary for either to occur.’” For an article about the study in Mad In America, , click here.

“Comics Can Help You Understand Mental Health!”

“Art can be a way to explain to your loved ones what you are feeling, and if you do not have the emotional energy needed to enter a big conversation, maybe directing them to some comics could help! Not only can art help to destigmatize mental illnesses, but it can also lend a hand to those who may be struggling,” writes the author of this article, which includes examples of mental health-related comics. Among the artists featured are Charles Schulz, Allie Brosh, and Gemma Correll. For the article, click here

“The Impact of Isolation” on Mental Health Is Explored by NPR

“Humans are social animals, equipped with brains hard-wired to connect with those around us,” according to a podcast on NPR about “The Impact of Isolation.” “We rely on relationships for safety and survival, as well as love and fulfillment. And when we’re deprived of those connections, we suffer—both psychologically and physically. On this episode, we explore what happens to our health and our minds when we’re faced with isolation. We hear stories about dealing with the isolation of solitary confinement, medical quarantine, and even the lonely journey to another planet.” To listen, click here.

“Conversations About Intimacy and Sexuality: A Training Toolkit” Is Offered Free by TU Collaborative

The latest newsletter of the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion offers a link to its groundbreaking publication “Conversations About Intimacy and Sexuality: A Training Toolkit Using Motivational Interviewing.” “Forming intimate relationships and expressing sexuality can be challenging for anyone, including people with mental health conditions. This toolkit contains information related to preparing direct service personnel for discussions on topics of intimacy and sexuality with persons with mental health conditions. Informed by the Motivational Interviewing technique, this toolkit includes experiential exercises with instructions, evaluation forms, hyperlinks to resources, and references to be used by trainers.” For the newsletter,  click here.

“For Valentine’s Day, Try Being Nice to Yourself,” The New York Times Advises

Although Valentine’s Day 2019 has come and gone, this New York Times article offers some advice without an expiration date: “Numerous studies have shown that self-compassion is strongly linked to overall well-being. Practicing self-compassion can reduce depression, stress, performance anxiety and body dissatisfaction. It can lead to increases in happiness, self-confidence and even immune function.” For the article, click here.

The February 2019 Digest of Articles about the Criminal Justice System, in Which Many Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Are Incarcerated (and the Key Update continues after this Digest)

Here is the February wrap-up of stories about the criminal justice system. (Note: Some of the titles and other language are not politically correct but are reproduced as written.) For “Mentally Ill Prisoners Are Held Past Release Dates, Lawsuit Claims,” click here. For “The Safety Net Is Broken: How Police Became Mental Health First Responders,” click here. For “Costly, ineffective, cruel: How Oregon snares mentally ill people charged with low-level crimes,” click here. For “Mother sues Texas Prisons after ‘egregious’ failure to prevent son’s suicide,” click here. For “No one should have to lose a son the way I lost my son,” click here. For “Report: Public Defender Represents 1,200 Clients in One Year,” click here. For “‘I’m Going to Die Here,’ She Told the Guards. They Didn’t Listen,” click here. For “Jail or Bail? There’s a New Option,” click here. For “Most Inmates with Mental Illness Still Wait for Decent Care,” click here. For “In landmark move, L.A. County will replace Men’s Central Jail with mental health hospital for inmates,” click here. For “Psychiatric Patients Need Hospital Beds, Not Jail Cells,” click here. For “Opinion—Alabama executions: strictly a Christian affair,” click here. For “John Jay’s PRI Advocates to Expand Alternative-to-Incarceration and Reentry Services in New York State,” click here. For “State of Phone Justice: Local jails, state prisons and private phone providers,” click here. For “Psychiatry on Death Row: Interviews From the Inside,” click here. For “How the Federal Government Undermines Prison Education,” click here. For “Finding College by Way of Prison,” click here. For “Prisons Across the U.S. Are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People’s Voice Prints,” click here. For “The Supreme Court Just Struck a Huge, Unanimous Blow Against Policing for Profit,” click here. For “Do Jails Kill People?” click here. For “For Cops, Stress May Be the Biggest Danger. This City Is Trying New Ways to Improve Their Mental Health,” click here. For “Barbaric and Excessive: Two Books on Punishment in the United States,” click here. For “When Going to Jail Means Giving Up the Meds That Saved Your Life: How the Americans with Disabilities Act could change the way the nation’s jails and prisons treat addiction,” click here.

FROM PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE KEY UPDATE BUT STILL FRESH!

Mental Health First Aid Australia Seeks Research Participants to Update MHFA Guidelines

Mental Health First Aid Australia is inviting people from Australia, UK, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA who have expertise in the field of psychosis to participate in research whose goal is to update the Mental Health First Aid guidelines for psychosis, which were last updated in 2008. Invited participants include people with lived experience of psychosis, people who have cared for or provided significant support to someone with psychosis, and professionals with research, education, or clinical experience related to psychosis. For more information, click here.

UK Researcher, Together with World Dignity Project, Seeks Your Input on “Patient Experience”

If you “have ever consulted a medical professional about a mental health or psychological issue,” you are invited to participate in “a study about the patient experience relating to mental health.” The researcher, Claire Brooks, writes: “The results of this study will be used to open up important discussions with Mental Health Professionals about how to create dignity in patient experience, relating to mental health. The study asks you to tell me about two patient experiences relating to mental health. You can tell your story in writing online or by posting a 2-3 minute video from your mobile phone. We will also ask for your own opinions on how the patient experience can ensure dignity...” For more information and/or to participate, click here.

Thanks, Global Mental Health Peer Network Newsletter, via Elizabeth R. Stone

International Survey on Antipsychotic Medication Withdrawal Seeks Respondents

“Have you taken antipsychotic medication (such as Zyprexa, Seroquel, Abilify, Risperdal, Haldol, Geodon, Stelazine, and others), for any condition or diagnosis, with or without other medications? And did you ever stop taking antipsychotics, or try to stop taking them? Are you 18 years or older? If yes, you can take this survey about antipsychotic withdrawal and attempts to withdraw, including if you stopped taking them completely or if you tried to come off and still take them. The survey aims to improve mental health services by better understanding medication withdrawal. Lead researcher is Will Hall, a therapist and Ph.D. student who has himself taken antipsychotics. Service users/survivors/consumers from around the world also gave input. The study is sponsored by Maastricht University in the Netherlands; co-sponsors include the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. Questions? Please contact will.hall@maastrichtuniversity.nl.”  For more information or to take the survey, click on www.antipsychoticwithdrawalsurvey.com

Do You Hear Voices? OurVoicesRaised Wants Your Story!

OurVoicesRaised.org, “a collective of people who have found support through the Hearing Voices Movement,” is conducting “a research project investigating Hearing Voices Groups in the United States. We’re interested in gaining a better understanding of how Hearing Voices groups work and what essential elements of hearing voices groups make them effective for people who hear voices, see visions or have other unusual or extreme experiences…This project is committed to sharing its findings with the community that has generated them (and beyond), and to create opportunities for the hearing voices community to expand its work in new ways.” Gail Hornstein, a psychology professor at Mount Holyoke and author of Agnes’s Jacket: A Psychologist’s Search for the Meanings of Madness, is principal investigator. For more information and/or to participate, click here.

New Virtual Group Is Launched to Advance Peer Research Capacity, Leadership, and Involvement

Nev Jones, Ph.D., and Emily Cutler, a doctoral candidate, have launched a new listserv dedicated to building research capacity, leadership, and involvement among peers, survivors, and service users.  Dr. Jones, assistant professor, Department of Mental Health Law & Policy, University of South Florida, was part of the team that developed “User/Survivor Leadership & Capacity Building in Research: White Paper on Promoting Engagement Practices in Peer Evaluation/Research (PEPPER),” published by the Lived Experience Research Network. For the white paper, click here. Anyone interested in joining the virtual group can email Nev at nev.inbox@gmail.com.

Disclaimer: The Clearinghouse does not necessarily endorse the opinions and opportunities included in the Key Update.

About The Key Update

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 15, No. 8, February 2019. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at selfhelpclearinghouse@gmail.com (and please note that this is a new email address). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

 

Key Update, January 2019, Volume 15, Number 7

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

TO CONTACT THE CLEARINGHOUSE: SELFHELPCLEARINGHOUSE@GMAIL.COM                          TO CONTACT SUSAN ROGERS: SUSAN.ROGERS.ADVOCACY@GMAIL.COM                                    TO CONTACT JOSEPH ROGERS: JROGERS08034@GMAIL.COM

Psychiatric Hospitals with Safety Violations Still Get Accreditation,” WSJ Reports

“More than 100 psychiatric hospitals are still fully accredited by the Joint Commission, despite significant safety violations, including care lapses associated with patient deaths and abuse, a database investigation by The Wall Street Journal found. The nonprofit accrediting organization revoked or denied full accreditation to less than 1 percent of psychiatric hospitals it reviewed in fiscal year 2014 and 2015, according to the most recent federal data available. About 16 percent of those hospitals each year (about 140 institutions) operated with such severe safety violations that they jeopardized their federal funding, state inspectors found. But troubled hospitals use their continued accreditation to attract new patients, even after some facilities lost Medicare funding due to ongoing safety incidents. For the WSJ article, click here. For another article about the WSJ report, click here.

FDA Reclassifies ECT Equipment into Lower-Risk Category Despite Controversy about ECT’s Risks

Despite a decades-long effort by mental health advocates to prevent the FDA from reclassifying the electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) device, as well as information from prominent researchers about the dangers of this controversial treatment (see below), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reclassified ECT equipment “for use in treating catatonia or a severe major depressive episode associated with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder in patients age 13 years and older who are treatment-resistant or who require a rapid response due to the severity of their psychiatric or medical condition” from Class III to Class II. The order became effective on December 26, 2018. Class III medical devices “present potential unreasonable risk of illness or injury”; only 10 percent of medical devices fall under this category. Class II medical devices (43 percent of devices) are considered to pose a lesser risk (click here). For the Federal Register announcement, click here. For critical praise for “Doctors of Deception: What They Don’t Want You to Know About Shock Treatment,” click here. For “Electroconvulsive Therapy Being Used on Teens in NHS Trusts”—in which Dr. Joanna Moncrieff of University College London says, “We just don't have enough research on what ECT does to the brain and the developing brain in younger people. We know it can cause permanent memory loss, so it suggests it may do permanent damage”—click here. For testimony by Daniel B. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., about the damaging impact of ECT, click here. For an article in Neuropsychopharmacology by Harold Sackeim, Ph.D., a proponent of ECT, in which he nevertheless concludes, “this study provides the first evidence in a large, prospective sample that adverse cognitive effects can persist for an extended period, and that they characterize routine treatment with ECT in community settings,” click here.

National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems Is Launched

The Administration for Community Living and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have announced the launch of the National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems (NCAPPS). “The goal of NCAPPS is to promote systems change that makes person-centered principles…a reality in the lives of people who require services and supports across the lifespan…Activities will include providing technical assistance to states, tribes, and territories; establishing communities of practice to promote best practices; hosting educational webinars; and creating a national clearinghouse of resources to support person-centered practice. NCAPPS will be administered by the Human Services Research Institute (HSRI).” For details, click here.

Parents with Mental Health Conditions Are 8 Times as Likely as Parents without Mental Health Conditions to Have Contact with Child Protective Services, National Survey Shows

A national survey of 42,761 adults recently published in Psychiatric Services found that parents with a serious mental health condition “were approximately eight times more likely to have CPS [Child Protective Services] contact and 26 times more likely to have a change in living arrangements compared with parents without a serious mental [health condition]. Even when the analysis was limited to parents who had CPS contact, [these] parents were at greater risk of custody loss compared with parents without [a] mental [health condition]….Efforts to reduce CPS involvement would likely reduce stress and enhance recovery and mental health for parents and their children.” For the abstract, click here. For “Preventing Custody Loss: Suggestions for Parents with Psychiatric Disabilities,” published by the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion, click here.

Mental Health First Aid Australia Seeks Research Participants to Update MHFA Guidelines

Mental Health First Aid Australia is inviting people from Australia, UK, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA who have expertise in the field of psychosis to participate in research whose goal is to update the Mental Health First Aid guidelines for psychosis, which were last updated in 2008. Invited participants include people with lived experience of psychosis, people who have cared for or provided significant support to someone with psychosis, and professionals with research, education, or clinical experience related to psychosis. For more information, click here.

Save the Date! Alternatives 2019 to Be Held in Washington, DC, July 7-11!

Mark your calendars! Alternatives 2019 will be held at The Catholic University of America (CUA) in Washington, D.C., July 7-11, 2019! The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery, which is organizing and sponsoring the event, writes: Last year we returned to our roots: We held Alternatives 2018 at a university for the first time in decades, without relying on federal funding, the way our movement for social justice first began… Alternatives 2019 will include a two-day pre-conference, July 8 and 9, with advocacy training on Monday and a ‘Hill Day’ on Tuesday, when peer advocates will meet, by appointment, with the staff of their U.S. senators and congressional representatives. Now more than ever, it is important for us to participate in the national debate.” For the conference announcement, which includes additional information, click here.

“‘Circles’ Could Offer Promising Outcomes After Incarceration for People with Serious Mental [Health Conditions]”

To address the special needs of people with mental health conditions and a criminal justice history, the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion has devised a program that would support these individuals after they are released. The program involves creating “circles of support and accountability”: a regular group session in which friends, neighbors, and/or peers—i.e., others with mental health conditions who have been incarcerated—get together to talk about the challenges they face after prison. They might talk about how someone can find a job, build or rebuild relationships, or become involved in community activities. Group members then agree to help the person achieve a specific goal, which might be as simple as accompanying him or her to an event he or she wants to attend. For the article, click here. For more about the criminal justice system, in which many people with mental health conditions are incarcerated, see the monthly digest, below.

“Psychosis 365” Video Podcast Is Available for Free!

You can watch and listen to “Psychosis 365—Voices, Visions, and Other Realities”—for free! The daily video podcasts for the first seven days of January are by Matt Ball, who describes his own experiences with psychosis and mentions how connections can be key to restoring balance; Noel Hunter—“Trauma is real, discrimination is real, oppression is real... just because people are suffering with these doesn't mean they have a brain disease”; Oryx Cohen, who “talks about how understanding the meaning behind our experiences is a way of being less distressed by them”; Laura, who “talks about the value of her lived experience, the value of the voices and her communication with them”; Ross, who “talks about his experiences of being labelled”; Louisa Dent Pearce, who “talks about how psychosis is a normal part of spiritual evolution for many people”; and Debra Lampshire, who “talks about psychosis as a normal response to extreme anxiety or distress.” And there’s much more! For the video podcasts, a project of HUMANE Clinic in Adelaide, Australia, click here.

“Child Abuse Linked to Risk of Suicide in Later Life”

“Children who experience physical, sexual, and emotional abuse or neglect are at least two to three times more likely to attempt suicide in later life, according to the largest research review carried out of the topic,” Medical Xpress recently reported. “The analysis of 68 studies by psychologists at the University of Manchester and University of South Wales revealed that suicide attempts were: three times more likely for people who experienced sexual abuse as a child; two and a half times more likely for people who experienced physical abuse as a child; [and] two and a half times more likely for people who experienced emotional abuse or neglect as a child.” The research team leader noted, “Around one adult in every three has experienced abuse as a child.” For the article, click here. For the video of Billy Joel’s “You’re Only Human (Second Wind),” which is aimed at preventing youth suicide, click here.

“Abandoning Restraint and Seclusion Has Unexpected Benefits, Study Finds”

“When a large service provider for people with developmental disabilities decided to move away from using restraint and seclusion, a new study finds safety improved and costs went down,” Disability Scoop recently reported. “Over a 12-year period, restraints decreased 99 percent and seclusion was eliminated at the Virginia-based Grafton Integrated Health Network, which serves more than 3,200 people with intellectual, developmental and psychiatric disabilities in residential and community-based settings. At the same time, the provider saw a 64 percent decline in client-induced staff injury and an estimated savings of $16 million in associated costs from overtime, turnover and workers’ compensation. Clients, meanwhile, were far more likely to achieve mastery in their goals.” For the article, click here. For more about seclusion and restraint, click here.

Clutter Is Bad for You, Researchers Say

Clutter increases your stress and cortisol levels, according to DePaul University researchers, who also noted that procrastination is closely tied to clutter. As The New York Times, writing about the 2017 study, recently reported: “The findings add to a growing body of evidence that clutter can negatively impact mental well-being, particularly among women.” An earlier study, by researchers at the University of Southern California, recommended that people who want to declutter take a “hands-off approach.” “Have somebody else hold [the item] and say, ‘Do you need this?’ Once you touch the item, you are less likely to get rid of it.” For the New York Times article, click here. For Times subscribers, the article includes a link to The Tidy Home Challenge: “Our subscriber-exclusive program will help you organize your home, step by step and room by room,” the Times promises. For 15 de-cluttering tips from tidying expert Marie Kondo, click here.

NACBHDD 2019 Legislative and Policy Conference to Be Held in Washington, DC, March 4-6

The 2019 Legislative and Policy Conference of the National Association of County Behavioral Health and Developmental Disability Directors (NACBHDD) will be held in Washington, DC, March 4-6, 2019. The conference theme is “Taking Stock of Key Developments.” Topics include “Progress on Medicaid and Affordable Care Act Update,” “National Response to the Opioid Epidemic,” “Solving Workforce Issues at the State Level,” “Key Developments in the Medicaid Program,” “State Brain Drain,” “Update on Federal Mental Health and Substance Use Initiatives,” “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Training for Providers,” and “Discussion of 2019 NACBHDD Legislative Agenda,” as well as a Hill Day. NACBHDD executive director Ron Manderscheid, Ph.D., writes: “…Assistant Secretary Dr. Elinore McCance-Katz will be joining us for the latest on SAMHSA and its programs. NACBHDD has arranged a block of sleeping rooms at the Cosmos Club [2121 Massachusetts Avenue, NW] for the nights of March 3-5. Reservations can be made by calling 202-387-7783 and identifying the NACBHDD room block.” To register, click here.

Mental Health Cartoons Take a Light Approach to a Serious Topic

For some “[c]artoons and comics that show mental health problems with sensitivity, honesty and humour,” click here.

Doctors in Shetland, Scotland, Can Now Prescribe Nature to Their Patients

Doctors in Shetland, Scotland, are now authorized to prescribe nature  to their patients. “It's thought to be the first program of its kind in the U.K., and seeks to reduce blood pressure, anxiety, and increase happiness for those with diabetes, a mental [health condition], stress, heart disease, and more,” Big Think reports. “If you spend 90 minutes of your day outside in a wooded area, there will be a decrease of activity in the part of your brain typically associated with depression. Spending time in nature not only reduces blood pressure, anxiety, and increases happiness, but it reduces aggression [and] ADHD symptoms, [and] improves pain control, the immune system,” and more. For the article, click here. For a related story, “It’s Official: Spending Time Outside Is Good for You,” click here.

The January 2019 Digest of Articles about the Criminal Justice System, in Which Many Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Are Incarcerated (and the Key Update continues after this Digest)

Here is the January wrap-up of stories about the criminal justice system. (Note: Some of the titles and other language are not politically correct but are reproduced as written.) For “St. Paul Police Expanding New Mental Health Unit,” click here. For “US Sentencing Commission introduces big new report on ‘Intra-City Differences in Federal Sentencing Practices,’” click here. For “Locked Up for Three Decades Without a Trial: A New York City Man has been shuffled between Rikers Island and mental hospitals for 32 years,” click here. For “Prisons are housing mental health patients who’ve committed no crimes,” click here. For “An Atlas of American Gun Violence. Five Years. More than 150,000 Shootings. How Has Gun Violence Marked Your Corner of the Country?” click here. For “Prison Food Is Making U.S. Inmates Disproportionately Sick,” click here. For “How Solitary Confinement Drove a Young Inmate to the Brink of Insanity,” click here. For “Out from the Holocaust: Germany reckoned with its past to build a better justice system. America should too,” click here. For “Rethinking Incarceration: What needs to be done to end our half-century long incarceration nightmare?” click here. For “‘Punishment Without Crime’ Highlights the Injustice of America’s Misdemeanor System,” click here. For “113 million adults in America have had an immediate family member incarcerated and, right now, 6.5 million adults have an immediate family member currently incarcerated in jail or prison,” click here. For “Jazmine Barnes Case Shows How Trauma Can Affect Memory,” click here. For “Congressional report: Misconduct by federal prison leaders ‘ignore’ and ‘covered up’ on a regular basis,” click here. For “For years, L.A. prosecutors failed to disclose misconduct by police witnesses. Now the D.A.’s office is trying to change that,” click here. For “The Supreme Court Said No More Life Without Parole for Kids. Why Is Antonio Espree One of the Few to Get Out of Prison?” click here. For “Chicago’s Jail Is One of the Country’s Biggest Mental Health Care Providers. Here’s a Look Inside,” click here. For “Why today’s criminal justice reform efforts won’t end mass incarceration,” click here. For “Illinois Agrees to Federal Oversight of Troubled Prison Health Care System,” click here. For “American Bar Association Death Penalty Representation Project Year End 2018” articles, click here. For “Cops Charged with Manslaughter After Two Mental-Health Patients Were Left to Drown in Sheriff’s Van During Hurricane Florence,” click here. For “A Road to Ending Mass Incarceration?” click here. For “Sent to a Hospital, But Locked in Prison,” click here. For “‘Ignored to Death’ in the Bexar County Jail: Janice Dotson-Stephen’s death is another tragic example of how bad the criminal justice system is at dealing with mentally ill people who enter it,” click here. For “U-M student podcast helps former prisoners tell their stories,” click here. For “We Are Witnesses,” by the Marshall Project, click here. For “Ex-Inmate Describes Nine Years in Georgia Solitary Unit—‘I’ve Seen People Go Crazy,’” click here. For “Inmates battling addiction get an unlikely ally: a puppy,” click here. For “Bad forensic science is putting innocent people in prison,” click here. For “From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts,” click here. For “The FBI Says Its Photo Analysis Is Scientific Evidence. Scientists Disagree,” click here. For “A Funder Helps L.A. Use the Arts to Advance Juvenile Justice Reform,” click here. For a recent newsletter of the National Reentry Resource Center, click here.

FROM PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE KEY UPDATE BUT STILL FRESH!

2019 NARMH Conference Invites You to Submit a Proposal

The National Association for Rural Mental Health (NARMH) is inviting you to submit a proposal to present at the 2019 annual NARMH conference, August 26-29 in Santa Fe, New Mexico! The theme is “From Surviving to Thriving: Embracing Connections.” For more information, and/or to submit a proposal (deadline “February 1, 2019, or until the agenda is filled”), click here.

Should the HIPAA Rules Be Loosened? Your Opinion Is Wanted.

Do you think the HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) Rules, which protect individuals’ privacy and security, should be relaxed? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office for Civil Rights (OCR), wants to know. “[I]n recent years, OCR has heard calls to revisit aspects of the Rules that may limit or discourage information sharing needed for coordinated care or to facilitate the transformation to value-based health care,” OCR writes. So do you think that any of the Rules “may present obstacles to these goals without meaningfully contributing to the privacy and security of protected health information (PHI) and/or patients’ ability to exercise their rights with respect to their PHI”? One example OCR offers is “facilitating parental involvement in care.” Another is “Changing the current requirement for certain providers to make a good faith effort to obtain an acknowledgment of receipt of the Notice of Privacy Practices.” Public comments are due by February 11, 2019. For details and for the comment link, click here.

Thanks, Elizabeth R. Stone

UK Researcher, Together with World Dignity Project, Seeks Your Input on “Patient Experience”

If you “have ever consulted a medical professional about a mental health or psychological issue,” you are invited to participate in “a study about the patient experience relating to mental health.” The researcher, Claire Brooks, writes: “The results of this study will be used to open up important discussions with Mental Health Professionals about how to create dignity in patient experience, relating to mental health. The study asks you to tell me about two patient experiences relating to mental health. You can tell your story in writing online or by posting a 2-3 minute video from your mobile phone. We will also ask for your own opinions on how the patient experience can ensure dignity...” For more information and/or to participate, click here.

Thanks, Global Mental Health Peer Network Newsletter, via Elizabeth R. Stone

International Survey on Antipsychotic Medication Withdrawal Seeks Respondents

“Have you taken antipsychotic medication (such as Zyprexa, Seroquel, Abilify, Risperdal, Haldol, Geodon, Stelazine, and others), for any condition or diagnosis, with or without other medications? And did you ever stop taking antipsychotics, or try to stop taking them? Are you 18 years or older? If yes, you can take this survey about antipsychotic withdrawal and attempts to withdraw, including if you stopped taking them completely or if you tried to come off and still take them. The survey aims to improve mental health services by better understanding medication withdrawal. Lead researcher is Will Hall, a therapist and Ph.D. student who has himself taken antipsychotics. Service users/survivors/consumers from around the world also gave input. The study is sponsored by Maastricht University in the Netherlands; co-sponsors include the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal. Questions? Please contact will.hall@maastrichtuniversity.nl.”  For more information or to take the survey, click on www.antipsychoticwithdrawalsurvey.com

Do You Hear Voices? OurVoicesRaised Wants Your Story!

OurVoicesRaised.org, “a collective of people who have found support through the Hearing Voices Movement,” is conducting “a research project investigating Hearing Voices Groups in the United States. We’re interested in gaining a better understanding of how Hearing Voices groups work and what essential elements of hearing voices groups make them effective for people who hear voices, see visions or have other unusual or extreme experiences…This project is committed to sharing its findings with the community that has generated them (and beyond), and to create opportunities for the hearing voices community to expand its work in new ways.” Gail Hornstein, a psychology professor at Mount Holyoke and author of Agnes’s Jacket: A Psychologist’s Search for the Meanings of Madness, is principal investigator. For more information and/or to participate, click here.

Virtual Group Is Launched to Advance Peer Research Capacity, Leadership, and Involvement

Nev Jones, Ph.D., and Emily Cutler, a doctoral candidate, have launched a new listserv dedicated to building research capacity, leadership, and involvement among peers, survivors, and service users.  Dr. Jones, assistant professor, Department of Mental Health Law & Policy, University of South Florida, was part of the team that developed “User/Survivor Leadership & Capacity Building in Research: White Paper on Promoting Engagement Practices in Peer Evaluation/Research (PEPPER),” published by the Lived Experience Research Network. For the white paper, click here. Anyone interested in joining the virtual group can email Nev at nev.inbox@gmail.com.

Disclaimer: The Clearinghouse does not necessarily endorse the opinions and opportunities included in the Key Update.

About The Key Update

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is now affiliated with the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion!

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 15, No. 7, January 2019. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at selfhelpclearinghouse@gmail.com (and please note that this is a new email address). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH